Shift Happens
4 years ago
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Shift Happens Update: Speakers, Tickets and Bursaries

Good afternoon Tumblrs,

I just thought I should take a few moments to give you a short Shifty Update.

We’ve all been busy in the Pilot Theatre office working away to make sure our third annual Shift Happens Conference (on the 5th and 6th July 2010) is the best yet. We are particularly proud of our speaker list, which now boasts a range of fabulous names from the world of Arts, Learning and Digital Technology including Sir Ken Robinson, who is a world renowned expert in Creativity and the Arts (have a look at his site www.sirkenrobinson.com); David Sabel, Head of Digital at the National Theatre (www.nationaltheatre.org.uk); and Jonathan Harris (www.number27.org) who creates works which re-imagine how we use the internet, and will be flying over from the States especially to speak at Shift Happens- presenting a rare opportunity for the UK to hear from Jonathan and learn more about his work.

We’ve got lots of other speakers as well, and if you want to learn more about them, then have a look at our virtual programme on http://tinyurl.com/SH-onlinebrochure.

If you haven’t yet booked your tickets, then please visit http://www.shift-happens.co.uk. Places are filling up fast- and we would hate for you to miss out on everything this year. We are also offering three bursary places to Students/ Under 25s; you can find out more information about these by visiting http://tinyurl.com/SH-bursary.


If you have any questions about the conference, then please contact me in the Pilot Theatre office on the details below.

Katherine Jewkes
Projects and Development Coordinator
Katherine@pilot-theatre.com

http://twitter.com/shift_happens
www.shift-happens.co.uk

http://twitter.com/pilot_theatre
www.pilot-theatre.com

4 years ago
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How Community Arts Organizations Are Using Social Media

How Community Arts Organizations Are Using Social Media


Emily Goligoski works with Federated Media’s strategic programs group and hosts a video interview series with female entrepreneurs for the Bay Area organization Women 2.0. She blogs about arts and culture in San Francisco, and you can follow her on Twitter.

As more diverse organizations dive into web marketing, for-profit organizations can learn well from their indie counterparts about experimentation and innovation online. A few notable community and arts groups have been inventive in their use of social media and truly collaborative in their outreach in ways that even the most seasoned corporate marketer can appreciate.

Among the arts and community organizations using social media thoughtfully and in big ways (which aren’t necessarily representative of their limited budgets) are independent artists and companies in photography, film, modern art, radio and craft. They’ve capitalized on the audiovisual nature of the Web to showcase the storytelling and community-building aspects of their work, and the results are worth a pass-along.


Photography


In part because of the costs associated with publishing glossy books and magazines, photography communities seem to have taken to online content sharing and promotion in greater volume than many performing arts and regionally-focused organizations. Not being limited by physical page size and printing timelines allows the creators of documentary photo sites to highlight contributor work in more timely and artistic ways, as both Vewd and Blueeyes Magazine demonstrate.

Compared to print collateral, gallery owners and crowdsourced photography publishers say they find that creating a cohesive public presence is simple when the images they present are complimentary across Flickr, their homepages, and the thumbnail versions of logos they use to identify themselves across communities. For users, being able to spend as much time as they like poring over work on sites like the still photography and multimedia showcase MediaStorm is a better professional and amateur photography viewing experience than having museum crowds push them along.

When it comes to fresh content being shared in myriad ways, contemporary online photo publisher Flak Photo has made a model of itself. Sure, it has a six day a week photo newsletter down pat, in addition to Twitter (@flakphoto) and Facebook integration, but the distinguishing factor of Andy Adams’ site is the number of opportunities it offers photographers to promote their work. Photography book reviews, sponsorships and ads, features that are co-promotional for the site and the photographers, and email submissions create a truly community-oriented site for curators, editors and photo fans.

Adams, who schedules, promotes, and publishes Flak Photo from his Wisconsin apartment, said the major benefit of forums and Facebook has been the international dialogue they inspire about the work he features. But they also make creating and distributing photography-related content more cost effective than ever before. “In trying to create something that is entirely in the form of the web, not tied to an event or a physical space, I’ve found that success has been influenced by larger monitor resolutions and high speed Internet connections as much an anything else,” Adams said.

Another photography-driven initiative, the non-profit Slideluck Potshow, has cast a similarly wide social net in their Ning network and offline event-based endeavors. In setting up community photography nights to encourage visual appreciation and arts education, they use blog content from organizers around the world, extensive photosharing, and myriad posts on local events sites to get the word out. The result is a global programming series that’s become the most well known group gathering since the Hungry for Obama dinners.


Film


One of the independent film initiatives that’s helped put crowdsourced content on the map, IndieGoGo has used myriad approaches to introduce their resources, including event-based word of mouth and a filmmaker-oriented Facebook app. In convincing producers and project coordinators to use the site as a catalyst for fundraising, the bi-coastal team of three founders created graphical navigation elements and an easily searchable film project index. The result is a set of customized tools that can be passed along across social networks to free directors and production teams up for filmmaking.

As for fine film lovers, those who expect their online hubs to be as carefully constructed as their favorite Kubrick do well by joining The Auteurs. The Palo Alto-based initiative encourages filmmakers and fans to wax poetic about their favorite techniques and themes, and the rotating web-based film festivals in the Cinematheque section serve as a great introduction to experimental work. The pay-per-view model has a broader selection base than many sites (including the internationally recognized Criterion Collection), but the portions that are most threatening from a time-suck perspective are the forums and critiques.

Beyond the startup set, The Museum of Modern Art’s film series’ diverse selections are accessible through trailers and interactive programming notes from curators on the MoMAMultimedia site. The Flash projects demonstrating printmaking and other artistic mediums are great, but the well-catalogued shorts and special exhibition videos are the most exemplary: their presentation in a clear, easy-to-use format has take-home value for e-retailers in particular.


Modern art


When Gray Area Foundation for the Arts opens its new gallery space for contemporary work in San Francisco’s Tenderloin (where it will be the first permanent space for art in the otherwise less-than-desirable neighborhood), it will already have gained awareness from hundreds of art lovers worldwide through its pre-launch messaging via Twitter, Flickr, Facebook, and partnerships with participating artists.

As part of what GAFFTA executive director Josette Melchor calls these “standard issue tactics” and virtual “cost of entry” for organizations looking to expand their visibility and networks, she will be using Vimeo and iTunes to syndicate video content that highlights exhibitions and participating artists. “As a new media arts organization, we’re excited about building collaborative and data-driven artworks that are directly informed and shaped by human data and activity,” she said. “By incorporating social media into our actual art projects, we will not only be telling a compelling real-time story, but we’re also working to make these projects pre-disposed to spread using the same platforms.”

Other upstart spaces can learn well from Minneapolis’ Walker Art Center, where the exhibits aren’t the only well-curated and organized offering available to the public. Visitors’ initial options upon visiting WalkerArt.org include “Connect,” “Join,” and “Blogs” (with content on design, education, new media initiatives, and visual and performing arts). They also publish art history and analysis podcasts on the museum’s iTunes U channel, and curators’ comments are available through the mobile system Art on Call.

While old and large organizations can be accused of not being the most innovative (you may be able to name a few), the Brooklyn Museum’s use of community-oriented tools is a great example for similarly large companies looking to provide a variety of multimedia options. Beyond engaging with photo and video content, users are encouraged to join the Brooklyn Museum Posse and explore the museum’s online collections. Comments read like college art theory class discussions, and aggregated blog posts about visits to the museum compliment podcasts and network options for friending and following the institution. The $20 annual “socially networked museum membership” 1stfans offers exclusive event invitations and access to artist-created content on the protected Twitter art feed (@1stfans). And the “Tag! You’re It!” introduction to applying keywords to images is a fun and useful introduction for first-time uploaders.


Radio


The culture show The Sound of Young America has gained traction and donations by finding low cost ways to promote “a radio show about things that are awesome” and secured a national syndication deal with Public Radio International in the process. What began with an interview show that Jesse Thorn produced in his college dorm room has grown into a set of MaximumFun.org forums, podcasts recorded at comedy festivals around the country, and a lighthearted blog. The burgeoning content network still maintains Thorn’s personality and authenticity (as evidenced by Tweets (@youngamerican) that were among the most introspective upon Michael Jackson’s death) in ways that many online self-promoters lose in building their brands.

Given the financial bind that public broadcasting currently finds itself in with corporate sponsorships drying up, Chicago Public Radio hosted a social networking challenge where 20 people completed five web-based tasks, including uploading photos of themselves in WBEZ gear and tagging them “Fivetofive” on Flickr and creating station-themed haikus for Twitter, ending in a $5,000 donation from an anonymous donor. One of the participatory challenges included having podcast and radio listeners download the same dance song and show up en masse for a dance-off in the Chicago loop. Not your traditional pledge drive, no doubt.


Craft


In addition to hosting the annual craft conference “Summit of Awesome,” the DIY network Hello Craft makes educational and promotional resources available to independent makers. It invites handmade aficionados to contribute stories about inspiration and first sewing machine purchases to its weekly podcast. When it isn’t broadcasting, Hello Craft tweets about notable work in the crafting community along with the likes of embroidery guru @SublimeStitchn and handmade hub @Etsy.

The current economic situation has brought little in the way of positive news for non-profit and arts organizations, but the resourcefulness that several groups and sites have shown in spite of increasingly smaller marketing budgets provides a great example of creative resiliency. Some artists and executive directors say using social tools to promote their efforts is “second nature,” but their willingness to sample and invest time in such a variety of tools is promising for application developers and companies who can learn from them alike.

(This is a brilliant article from Mashable- read it on their site)


For more information on how your company can benefit from Social media, come to the Shift Happens Conference where you can hear from inspiring speakers from all sectors of the Arts..!

4 years ago
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4 years ago
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BBC tells news staff to embrace social media

BBC tells news staff to embrace social media

BBC journalists must keep up with technological change - or leave, the director of BBC Global News Peter Horrocks says

Q&A: Peter Horrocks on the BBC and social media

Peter Horrock Facebook/Twitter montage

Peter Horrocks: backing Facebook and Twitter. Photograph: Martin Godwin

BBC news journalists have been told to use social media as a primary source of information by Peter Horrocks, the new director of BBC Global News who took over last week. He said it was important for editorial staff to make better use of social media and become more collaborative in producing stories.

"This isn’t just a kind of fad from someone who’s an enthusiast of technology. I’m afraid you’re not doing your job if you can’t do those things. It’s not discretionary", he is quoted as saying in the BBC in-house weekly Ariel.

Horrocks said that technology was changing journalism, adding that it was important for the BBC to leave a programme-based mindset behind and adapt to new technologies.

Internationally, news organisations already have professionalised their approach towards user content and social media. For CNN the deep integration of social media marked an important step in improving their reporting and get closer to their sources – as seen recently with the coverage of the Haiti earthquake.

For BBC news editors, Twitter and RSS readers are to become essential tools, says Horrocks. Aggregating and curating content with attribution should become part of a BBC journalist’s assignment; and BBC’s journalists have to integrate and listen to feedback for a better understanding of how the audience is relating to the BBC brand.

Following the creation of a social media editor post in October, this marks another fundamental change in the Beep’s attitude towards social media.

Until now the broadcaster has been very cautious about social media. In the 160 pages of the BBC’s 2009 editorial guidelines, social media are mentioned only once: the editors are warned to “consider the impact of our re-use” of social media content. Although placed in the public domain already it will bring it to a wider audience, and there might be some copyright issues, the guidlines say.

Horrocks’s words mark a move in the opposite direction. As technology is changing the nature of journalism, the BBC is trying to keeping up with the pace. Horrocks, formerly head of the BBC’s multimedia newsroom, finds clear words for it: “If you don’t like it, if you think that level of change or that different way of working isn’t right for me, then go and do something else, because it’s going to happen. You’re not going to be able to stop it.”

4 years ago
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Listen to our #ShiftHappens audioboo’s

Listen to Audioboo’s recorded at last years conference, and the 2010 ALT Shift Launch Party held in January.

4 years ago
4 years ago
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We drove and we drove and it snowed and it snowed and a three hour drive became five and a half, crawling and sliding through slippery roads and all of the time we kept going north.
It was the kind of day you turn up the heat if you have it, or stuff wood in the stove if you don’t, and sometimes the fire gets too hot and burns down your house, and men in orange close down the road and wave batons and tell the cars how to go another way, and other men in orange pull out survivors, and there is the sound of sirens in the soft snow, and maybe you are listening or maybe you are falling up into the whiteness against the snow and the smoke which is finally heating your house and maybe you, too.
But then you exit the scene and the tragedy becomes part of your drama and finally the cloud curtain rises on the final act which always has to have a sunset and which usually involves coming home in one way or another.


This is a recent photo from Jonathan Harris’ Number 27 project, where he has decided to take one photo a day, every day for a year after his 30th birthday.
Jonathan is joining us at Shift Happens: ALT Shift in July 2010, we’re all excited about having him with us. If you would like to know more about his work, visit http://www.number27.org/ -it’s definitely worth a look.

We drove and we drove and it snowed and it snowed and a three hour drive became five and a half, crawling and sliding through slippery roads and all of the time we kept going north.

It was the kind of day you turn up the heat if you have it, or stuff wood in the stove if you don’t, and sometimes the fire gets too hot and burns down your house, and men in orange close down the road and wave batons and tell the cars how to go another way, and other men in orange pull out survivors, and there is the sound of sirens in the soft snow, and maybe you are listening or maybe you are falling up into the whiteness against the snow and the smoke which is finally heating your house and maybe you, too.

But then you exit the scene and the tragedy becomes part of your drama and finally the cloud curtain rises on the final act which always has to have a sunset and which usually involves coming home in one way or another.

This is a recent photo from Jonathan Harris’ Number 27 project, where he has decided to take one photo a day, every day for a year after his 30th birthday.

Jonathan is joining us at Shift Happens: ALT Shift in July 2010, we’re all excited about having him with us. If you would like to know more about his work, visit http://www.number27.org/ -it’s definitely worth a look.

4 years ago
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30 Great iPhone Apps

30 top apps from Shakespeare to South Park

Ajesh Patalay picks the best apps out there on the web for culture vultures

HIS GIRL FRIDAY app

His Girl Friday, a 1940 comedy starring Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell, one of the classic films that can be viewed on the Joost app Photograph: Allstar/Cinetext/Columbia

MUSIC

Spotify (free to download, £9.99 monthly subscription) With more than three million UK users, this music streaming service lets you chose from over 6.5m tracks and listen to other users’ playlists (including Aural Contraceptive, a playlist of Charlie Brooker’s favourite passion killers).

REM (free)

A band that has always embraced technology (in 2008 they debuted their latest album on Facebook), REM have released an app that includes all the usual band-specific features – song clips, band/tour info – plus the facility to stream videos from their entire career. (Nothing beats “Everybody Hurts” on landscape mode.)

Classical Music Master Collection (£1.19)

Packed with 800 complete tracks (100 hours of music) by the great composers including Chopin, Beethoven, Mozart, Tchaikovsky and Bach, this app, currently discounted from its original price of more than £600, is this year’s biggest bargain.

Shazam Encore (£1.79)

Play a seconds-long sample of any song (off a radio, for example) and this app – one of the App Store’s biggest hits – identifies it, before linking to iTunes and recommending other similar music.

Play Ligeti (free)

This interactive app from the ENO lets users explore (and compose their own discordant version of) the car horn prelude from György Ligeti’s 1970s avant garde opera Le Grand Macabre.

London Philharmonic Orchestra (free)

Combining select LPO recordings (recent additions include Dvorák’s Requiem and Brahms’s Hungarian Dances), with video performances, podcasts, concert info and links to iTunes, this app sets the bar for resident orchestras.

Lady Gaga iOKi (£2.99)

Typically pioneering, Lady Gaga lends her name and music to an exemplary karaoke app, through which you also have access to a complete karaoke library of tracks in every genre. Cue “Sweet Caroline”.

Bachtrack for iPhone (free)

Search for classical concerts, ballets and operas by composer, performer, orchestra and location anywhere in the world months in advance and book tickets too.

Simplify Music 2 (£4.99)

With this app you can listen to your entire digital music collection from your home computer streamed live to your iPhone, and access the music collections of up to 30 friends.

EBOOKS

10 Stanza (free)

Offers access to more than 50,000 free ebooks (from Arthur Conan Doyle to Paolo Coelho), with the option to download the latest bestsellers should The Lost Symbol not have made it into your stocking this year.

11 The Red Apple (£0.59)

From Winged Chariot, which also published one of the first children’s picture book for iPhone The Surprise, comes this beautifully illustrated tale by Feridun Oral of a rabbit foraging in the snow.

12 William Shakespeare Collection (£1.19)

Reason not the need to download this exemplary app, which delivers an enviable compendium of Shakespeare’s 40 plays, 154 sonnets and six narrative poems to your pocket.

13 Johnny Cash: I See a Darkness (Soundtrack Edition) (£2.99)

This graphic novel biography of Cash’s life, covering his 1956 sessions with Presley, 1968 concerts in Folsom Prison and 1990s comeback, boasts a feature to synchronise your reading with iTunes-purchased music.

14 A Book of Nonsense (£0.59)

This app of Edward Lear’s 1846 collection of limericks reproduces the original whimsical ink drawings by Lear with each of the 112 witty verses.

15 Comics (free)

Along with iVerse and Dark Horse Comics, this must-have app for comics fans gives access to more than 70 free titles (including the made-for-iPhone comic Box 13, about the escapades of mystery novelist Dan Holiday) plus over 700 paid-for comics.

16 McSweeney’s (£3.49) From Dave Eggers’s publishing house, this app delivers exclusive content (short stories, films, interviews) from the likes of Spike Jonze, Miranda July and James Franco.

17 Bunny Munro (£9.99)

This enhanced version of Nick Cave’s The Death of Bunny Munro about a middle-aged drug-addled sex maniac comes with a synchronized audiobook voiced by Cave, videos of Cave reading and a soundtrack for the totally immersive experience.

FILM/TV

18 Joost (free)

Like the Babelgum app (through which you can watch all of Sally Potter’s film Rage), this video app streams music clips, television episodes (such as Peep Show) and classic films (including Laurel & Hardy, Buster Keaton and His Girl Friday starring Cary Grant).

19 Empire Movie Guide (£2.99)

Like Movie Genie (the app for online site Internet Movie Database), this is a must-have for film buffs with over 9,000 Empire magazine reviews, browsable by title, actor and director.

20 Charlie Chaplin: Short Film Collection Vols 1-5 (£1.19 each)

Turn your iPhone into a cinema with these five apps, which contain more than 30 short films by Chaplin including Mabel’s Busy Day, The Masquerader and The Rounders, plus Chaplin trivia and film summaries.

21 Cartoon Classics (£0.59 each)

Starring Bugs Bunny, Popeye, Superman, Betty Boop and Felix the Cat, this series of five Cartoon Classics apps equips you with some of the best cartoons of the 40s and 50s for amusement on even the slowest bus journeys home.

22 South Park Avatar Creator (£0.59)

Embracing the anarchic spirit of the original series, this app lets you create your own South Park character – hair style, clothes, accessories – then save it to your contacts list as a friend or relative.

23 The Guardian iPhone app (£2.39)

We would say this, wouldn’t we. But self-promotion aside, our recently launched app, giving you access to the best writing, image galleries and podcasts from the Guardian and the Observer, is a smart, user-friendly way of staying up to date while on the move.

MUSEUMS/ART

24 Love Art: National Gallery (£1.79)

Scroll through masterpieces by Da Vinci, Renoir and Rembrandt on this app, which contains high resolution images of more than 250 works from the National Gallery’s collection as well as video and audio commentaries.

25 Yours Vincent: The Letters of Van Gogh (free)

From Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum, this app breathes new life into the artist by dramatising his letters. Listen to audio readings and through videos and picture galleries see how his painting style evolved.

26 London: British Museum Guide & Audio (£2.99)

In addition to comprehensive visitor info, this app contains 60 minutes worth of audio commentary on many of the museum’s key exhibits including the Parthenon sculptures, the Benin bronzes and the Rosetta Stone.

MISCELLANEOUS

27 iTheatre (free)

An essential resource for theatregoers with listings, reviews and secure booking for all West End shows. The comparable Edinburgh Festival app iFringe, containing maps that locate every venue, is nothing short of a godsend.

28 Google Earth (free)

With access to not only locations but also 3D models of buildings around the world (as well as photos via the Panoramio feature), this is still the best app for architectural enthusiasts.

29 TED (free)

This app streams inspirational talks from Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED) conferences round the world with recent speakers including Gordon Brown, Steve Jobs and Al Gore (though Malcolm Gladwell talking about spaghetti sauce still tops the bill).

30 Wikipanion (free)

Currently the best Wikipedia app available, this indispensable reference tool is as useful as the Oxford Dictionary of English app – which, at £17.99, is rather pricier – and will help you make mincemeat of any pub quiz.

What an interesting article from Ajesh Patalay at the Observer! I’d like to add a few apps though..

ReelDirector is an excellent application which allows users to edit movies which have been shot using the iphone. It costs £4.99, and enables users to multitrack sound recordings, mix videos, add text watermarks at the beginning and end of the videos and much much more. You can then share your video by email, or save to Camera Roll, where you can upload it to YouTube, Twitter, Vimeo.. etc. I think TwitVid, which is a free application is the best method of uploading and sharing iPhone videos online.

Tube Deluxe is an excellent application to help you navigate around the underground system in London.

Classics is a really nice book reader, which has a particularly intuitive page turner action.

And finally, I think that Tone Pad and Player Piano are brilliant applications for those who crave a five minute music break.

What are your must have applications for the new year?

Katherine

4 years ago
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Welcome to the Shift Happens tumblr page.

This site will be a mash up of all the articles/ photos/ videos which we think are relevant to our Shift Happens Conference. You can read more information about that here.

Shift Happens:Alt Shift is run by Pilot Theatre. There are lots of the team who might be posting here, but it’ll usually be Katherine (our Projects and Development Coordinator) or Marcus (our Artistic Director) using this site.

Welcome to the Shift Happens tumblr page.

This site will be a mash up of all the articles/ photos/ videos which we think are relevant to our Shift Happens Conference. You can read more information about that here.

Shift Happens:Alt Shift is run by Pilot Theatre. There are lots of the team who might be posting here, but it’ll usually be Katherine (our Projects and Development Coordinator) or Marcus (our Artistic Director) using this site.

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